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Speakers
| Plenary | Invited - 1 | Invited - 2 | Invited - 3 | Invited - 4 | Invited - 5 | Invited - 6 |


Mariann Bienz Cambridge, UK (Invited)

We study the functions of individual Wnt signalling components and their molecular interactions, using cell-biological, biochemical and structural approaches, as well as fly and mouse animal models. One focus is on the role of Dishevelled, a dynamic polymeric adaptor that transduces the Wnt signal from the plasma membrane to the Axin complex, which also contains the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor and inactivates b-catenin. Our other focus is on the mechanism of b-catenin-mediated transcription, and how this process is controlled by the histone-decoding Pygo-BCL9 complex, and by ubiquitin turnover mediated by APC-associated Trabid. We aim to develop the potential of these Wnt signalling components as drug targets and, ultimately, to discover small molecules that inhibit their interactions and signalling activities.


Mariann Bienz

www


Owen Sansom Deputy Director, Beatson Institute, UK (Invited)

Owen's research is focused on a particular cell signalling pathway involving the Wnt protein. This pathway is overactive in cancer cells. They receive too many signals telling them to multiply, so they grow out of control to form a tumour. He discovered that faults in a gene called Apc, which are often found in bowel cancer, can cause overactive Wnt signalling, and is now trying to unpick the complex relationship between Apc and Wnt signalling.


Owen Sansom

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Marian Waterman Associate Director, Cancer Research Institute University of California, USA (Invited)

The Lab aims to identify molecular components of Wnt signaling pathways and the mechanisms by which Wnt pathways are activated and governed during embryonic development and human tumorigenesis. Over the past decade, they have identified a number of key molecules in Wnt signaling, including kinases and transmembrane receptor components, and elucidated their mechanisms of action in signal transduction.


Marian Waterman

www


Frederic de Sauvage Vice President, Molecular Biology, Genentech, San Francisco, USA (Invited)

The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a signaling cascade that directs patterning in most animals and is crucial for proper development. At the molecular level, Hh ligands drive cell proliferation in some cell types while causing others to undergo differentiation. Hh signaling is most active during embryogenesis and aberrant reactivation of the pathway in adult tissue can lead to the development of cancer. Mutations in the Hh receptor components, Patched (PTCH1) or Smoothened (SMOH), result in constitutive pathway activation and have been identified in basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma.


Marian Waterman

www

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