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Speakers
| Plenary | Invited - 1 | Invited - 2 | Invited - 3 | Invited - 4 | Invited - 5 | Invited - 6 |


Hans Clevers Utrecht, Netherlands (Keynote)

Lgr5 stem cells, Wnt signaling & cancer


Hans Clevers' research has driven paradigm shifts in our understanding of Wnt signalling in development and disease. The lab originally focused on T lymphocyte transcription factors, having cloned Tcf1 in 1991. With the discovery that Tcf factors are the final effectors of Wnt signaling, lab interests changed to the biology of Wnt signaling in intestinal self-renewal and cancer. His lab identified a series of adult tissue stem cells with the novel Lgr5 marker. Hans' research was the first to link Wnt signalling with adult stem cell biology, currently his major focus of research. This distinguished career in ground-breaking research has been recognized through numerous prestigious awards and prizes. Since 2012, Hans is president of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences.


HANS CLEVERS

www


Tony Burgess The Walter and Eliza Hall Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia (Plenary)

Tony Burgess has a stellar career as a cancer researcher on the Australian and world scene. His Lab aims to identify molecules that will inhibit cancer causing signals in colonic crypts and they have identified wnt signalling, src, receptor kinases, mitosis and pro-apoptotic molecules as potential therapeutic targets.


Tony Burgess

www


Randal Moon Seattle, USA (Plenary)

Randall Moon's seminal work has revealed that mutations in the Wnt pathway can lead to cancer and changes in bone mass and may have a connection to Alzheimer's. A weakened Wnt signal is involved in a degenerative disease of the retina. Even regeneration, a process whereby damaged or diseased tissue grows back and forms the correct structure, requires or is enhanced by Wnt signaling via β-catenin.


RANDALL MOON

www


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